Reflection on the Death of a Porcupine By D. H. Lawrence

 

D. H. Lawrence wrote these essays between 1915–1925, calling them "philosophicalish" and covering topics ranging from politics to nature, and from religion to education.

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D. H. Lawrence

Born in England on September 11, 1885, D. H. Lawrence is regarded as one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. Lawrence published many novels and poetry volumes during his lifetime, including Sons and Lovers and Women in Love, but is best known for his infamous novel Lady Chatterley’s Lover. The graphic and highly sexual novel was published in Italy in 1928, but was banned in the United States until 1959, and banned in England until 1960. Garnering fame for his novels and short stories early into his career—especially his collections The Fox, The Captain’s Doll, and The Ladybird and The Prussian Officer and Other Stories—Lawrence later received acclaim for his personal letters and poetry, in which he detailed a range of emotions, from exhilaration to depression to prophetic brooding. He died in France in 1930.

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D. H. Lawrence