Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) is one of the most beloved American writers of the twentieth century. Vonnegut's audience increased steadily since his first five pieces in the 1950s and grew from there. His 1968 novel Slaughterhouse-Five has become a canonic war novel with Joseph Heller's Catch-22 to form the truest and darkest of what came from World War II.

Vonnegut began his career as a science fiction writer, and his early novels--Player Piano and The Sirens of Titan--were categorized as such even as they appealed to an audience far beyond the reach of the category. In the 1960s, Vonnegut became closely associated with the Baby Boomer generation, a writer on that side, so to speak.

Now that Vonnegut's work has been studied as a large body of work, it has been more deeply understood and unified. There is a consistency to his satirical insight, humor and anger which makes his work so synergistic. It seems clear that the more of Vonnegut's work you read, the more it resonates and the more you wish to read. Scholars believe that Vonnegut's reputation (like Mark Twain's) will grow steadily through the decades as his work continues to increase in relevance and new connections are formed, new insights made.

Featured Books By Author

Slice of Life

The corridor of the Fine Arts Building was deserted, save for two figures at the far end, two men approaching slowly. Rose was about to go into the classroom, where she’d left her purse, when she saw a sign on the door—a crude sign in pencil, on a ragged sheet of paper.

"Collapse of Western Civilization — Dr. Norbert Beilstein," it said. "Visitors welcome."

Previously unpublished, Slice of Life—about a college coed’s winter-induced dream—is an early testament to Kurt Vonnegut’s original voice and curious imagination.

Read more

Sinbad

3.67

I had an uncle who left his hometown and the family business there to become a fine actor. His talent was a minor one, but a pretty one. It lasted for fifteen years and was gone. He came home with the ashes of it and died twenty years later, poor and, as it happened, drunk.

Previously unpublished, brilliant and deeply personal, Sinbad is Kurt Vonnegut’s story of a young man who decides, against the wishes of his family, to leave home to pursue life as a painter. The result is a picaresque as bizarre and imaginative as any of Vonnegut’s most beloved stories.

Read more

Selected Works of Kurt Vonnegut

3.67

The Selected Works of Kurt Vonnegut is a collection of noteworthy science-fiction titles penned by a beloved American author. Considered by most to be one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Kurt Vonnegut’s works offers profound insight into the human condition with words of charm and wit steeped in the rhythms of the everyday and in the extraordinary.
This collection includes two of his acclaimed novels, Cat’s Cradle and Galapagos, rounded off by two short stories, The Big Trip Up Yonder and Unready to Wear. In Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut’s fourth novel published in 1963 that explores themes including religion, technology and science with a satirical eye. Galapagos is Vonnegut's meditation on Darwinism, fate, and the essential irrelevance of the human condition. In The Big Trip Up Yonder, Kurt Vonnegut asks what would happen to human society if there was no death? In Kurt Vonnegut’s world, immortality isn’t exactly the gift it’s cracked up to be. Unready to Wear takes readers to the far future, where humanity has evolved to the point that the "spirit" can transcend the body. But there’s a cultural backlash from those who want to return to the body—and believe the spirit should stay there.

Read more

Books By
Kurt Vonnegut